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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

By | February 27, 2014

A new camera system supports the visualization of gliomas stained with Tumor Paint, a chlorotoxin-based imaging agent that’s currently in clinical trials.

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image: Paper-Based Cancer Test?

Paper-Based Cancer Test?

By | February 25, 2014

Nanoscale agents that detect disease-associated synthetic biomarkers in urine could one day streamline the diagnosis of tumors, heart disease, and more.

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image: Week in Review: February 10–14

Week in Review: February 10–14

By | February 14, 2014

First Ancient North American genome; cannabinoids connect hunger with olfaction and eating; biotechs explore crowdfunding; confronting creationism

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image: Opinion: Confronting Creationism

Opinion: Confronting Creationism

By | February 7, 2014

Five reasons why scientists should stay out of debates over evolution.

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image: An Offensive Playbook

An Offensive Playbook

By | February 1, 2014

Developing nonaddictive drugs to combat pain

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

10 Comments

image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

By | January 29, 2014

Swedish scientists have discovered why two antioxidants accelerate tumor growth in mice, helping to explain the results of disappointing human trials.

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