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image: Non-coding RNAs Halt Cell Death

Non-coding RNAs Halt Cell Death

By | December 7, 2011

Long, non-coding regions of RNA can prevent red blood cells from committing suicide during the final stage of differentiation.

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image: Opinion: Confounded Cancer Markers

Opinion: Confounded Cancer Markers

By | December 7, 2011

Prognostic signatures have become popular tools in cancer research, but it turns out signatures made of random genes are prognostic as well.

39 Comments

image: Brain Evolution at a Distance

Brain Evolution at a Distance

By | December 6, 2011

Gene expression controlled from afar may have spurred the spurt in brain evolution that led to modern humans.

1 Comment

image: Top 7 in Ecology

Top 7 in Ecology

By | December 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in ecology, from Faculty of 1000

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image: Resistance Outlasts Antibiotics

Resistance Outlasts Antibiotics

By | December 5, 2011

Antibiotic resistant bacteria keep their protective genes, even when antibiotics are no longer given.

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image: Cancer Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

Cancer Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

By | December 2, 2011

Lloyd Old, a researcher and former administrator of two cancer research institutes, passed away this week.

12 Comments

image: Cancer’s Escape Routes

Cancer’s Escape Routes

By | November 30, 2011

Scientists are beginning to discover myriad strategies tumors use to avoid attacks by anti-cancer drugs.

18 Comments

image: Evolutionary Pioneer Dies at 73

Evolutionary Pioneer Dies at 73

By | November 28, 2011

Lynn Margulis, an innovative thinker who proposed symbiosis as a major mechanism for speciation, passed away last week.

6 Comments

image: A Spoonful of Sugar

A Spoonful of Sugar

By | November 23, 2011

A special glucose molecule makes tumor cells more vulnerable to a pair of cancer cell-killing drugs.

3 Comments

image: An Obesity-Cancer Link?

An Obesity-Cancer Link?

By | November 22, 2011

Why obese individual are more likely to get cancer could be partly explained by a gene that activates both pathways.

3 Comments

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