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image: IDing Cancer with 3-D Genomics

IDing Cancer with 3-D Genomics

By | May 7, 2014

In a proof-of-principle study, scientists show that the three-dimensional shape of a cancer cell genome can reliably classify subtypes of human leukemia.

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image: Not So Different

Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Opinion: Overcoming Cancer’s Complexities

Opinion: Overcoming Cancer’s Complexities

By , , and | April 11, 2014

Considering “targeted therapeutics” in the face of intra-patient heterogeneity. 

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image: Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

By | April 11, 2014

Researchers collate a list of the 100 most rare and unique avian species facing extinction.

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image: Week in Review: April 7–11

Week in Review: April 7–11

By | April 11, 2014

Stress and telomere length in children; osmotic channel protein identified; amoeba nibbles, then kills cells; amphetamine and mental disorder risk; news from AACR

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image: Study: Coffee Cuts Cancer Risk

Study: Coffee Cuts Cancer Risk

By | April 10, 2014

Evidence presented at AACR suggests that daily coffee consumption may cut a person’s risk of developing a form of liver cancer.

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image: Obesity Complicates Colorectal Cancer

Obesity Complicates Colorectal Cancer

By | April 9, 2014

Study finds that prediagnosis obesity is predictive of poor prognosis, even among patients who have a molecular marker associated with better disease outcome.

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image: The Promise of Nanomedicine

The Promise of Nanomedicine

By | April 8, 2014

At AACR, scientists discuss the growing interest in nanotechnology and how it can be used to study, diagnose, and treat cancer.

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