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image: Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

By | January 29, 2014

Swedish scientists have discovered why two antioxidants accelerate tumor growth in mice, helping to explain the results of disappointing human trials.

3 Comments

image: New River Dolphin

New River Dolphin

By | January 27, 2014

DNA sequencing study reveals a new river dolphin species in South America.

2 Comments

image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

6 Comments

image: Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

By | January 23, 2014

A dog tumor that became a free-living parasite picked up myriad mutations, but has since stabilized.

8 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 13–17

Week in Review: January 13–17

By | January 17, 2014

Debating the origins of placental mammals; H. pylori-human coevolution; ant, bee, and wasp queens emit similar pheromones; profiling protein expression in single cancer cells

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image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

1 Comment

image: Next Generation: Cancer Cell Protein Profiling

Next Generation: Cancer Cell Protein Profiling

By | January 15, 2014

Antibody barcoding allows scientists and clinicians to analyze protein expression in small amounts of cancer tissue.

1 Comment

image: Clocks Versus Rocks

Clocks Versus Rocks

By | January 14, 2014

A new analysis suggests that placental mammals originated while dinosaurs were dominant, contradicting a recent high-profile study.

3 Comments

image: Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

Group Aims for Biomarker Standards

By | January 14, 2014

A new alliance between industry, academia, and the government wants to boost the “dismal” success rate of biomarker development.

0 Comments

image: Human-Pathogen Coevolution

Human-Pathogen Coevolution

By | January 13, 2014

Helicobacter pylori strains that share ancestry with their human hosts are less likely to cause severe disease.

3 Comments

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