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image: Take Two of These

Take Two of These

By | June 22, 2011

Drugmakers are teaming up to test the disease-fighting power of combination therapies earlier in the development cycle than ever before.

3 Comments

image: St. Jude postdoc faked images

St. Jude postdoc faked images

By | June 22, 2011

A former postdoctoral researcher at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital fudged images published in two papers, one of which has since been retracted.

100 Comments

image: HPV vaccine shows promise

HPV vaccine shows promise

By | June 22, 2011

An HPV vaccination program in Australia appears to have resulted in a drop in cervical lesions among young women.

6 Comments

image: Top 7 in immunology

Top 7 in immunology

By | June 21, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in immunology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000.

0 Comments

image: Communication helps target tumors

Communication helps target tumors

By | June 20, 2011

Proteins and nanoparticles that talk in order to more efficiently locate and treat tumors could reduce collateral damage to healthy tissues.

18 Comments

image: Asbestos effects long-lasting

Asbestos effects long-lasting

By | June 17, 2011

Fourteen years after closure, an asbestos plant is still damaging DNA

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image: Bigger spores = badder infection

Bigger spores = badder infection

By | June 17, 2011

Larger spores of a deadly fungal pathogen cause more virulent infections in mice.

3 Comments

image: Gould's bias

Gould's bias

By | June 16, 2011

A new study finds that Stephen J. Gould's criticisms of another scientist's data was misplaced, and the eminent biologist and historian succumbed to data bias himself.

0 Comments

image: Our own 60 mutations

Our own 60 mutations

By | June 15, 2011

New estimates of human mutation suggest that each of us harbor approximately 60 novel genetic mutations.

4 Comments

image: Ovarian cancer forces into new tissues

Ovarian cancer forces into new tissues

By | June 14, 2011

Ovarian tumor cells use cellular movement proteins to penetrate protective cell layers surrounding new target tissues during metastasis.

0 Comments

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