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image: Drunk Monkeys

Drunk Monkeys

By | March 1, 2015

UC Berkeley biologist Robert Dudley explains his "drunken monkey" hypothesis for how humans developed a taste for alcohol.

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image: Falling Out of the Family Tree

Falling Out of the Family Tree

By | March 1, 2015

A mutation in an ethanol-metabolizing enzyme arose around the time that arboreal primates shifted to a more terrestrial lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptation to eating fermented fruit.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2015

March 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

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image: Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

By | February 23, 2015

Scientists develop synthetic blood-based biomarkers to amplify tumor signals in a mouse model.

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image: Marine Life Trending Larger

Marine Life Trending Larger

By | February 23, 2015

Ocean animals have been getting bigger over the millennia, according to an analysis of thousands of genera that have plied Earth’s seas since the Cambrian Period.

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image: Exploring the Epigenome

Exploring the Epigenome

By | February 18, 2015

A National Institutes of Health-funded consortium publishes 111 reference maps of DNA and histone marks.

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image: Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

By | February 13, 2015

Researchers working in China have unearthed the fossil remains of two diminutive mammals that speak volumes about faunal diversity during the Jurassic Period.

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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

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image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

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