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image: DNA as an Artistic Medium

DNA as an Artistic Medium

By | October 26, 2016

An artist creates images on electrophoresis gels using exhibition visitors’ pooled genetic material.

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image: Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

Q&A: Sequencing Newborns

By | October 21, 2016

Members of the BabySeq Project discuss trial enrollment, preliminary findings.

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image: Week in Review: October 17–21

Week in Review: October 17–21

By | October 21, 2016

Report finds that pathologist involved in anonymous defamation case committed multiple acts of misconduct; growing eggs from stem cells; neutrophils’ role in metastasis; convergent evolution in birds

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image: Common STD May Have Come from Neanderthals

Common STD May Have Come from Neanderthals

By | October 20, 2016

Cross-species trysts likely spread human papillomavirus (HPV) to Homo sapiens, according to new research.

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image: Exome Dataset Expands to Whole Genome

Exome Dataset Expands to Whole Genome

By | October 19, 2016

Members of the Exome Aggregation Consortium launch the Genome Aggregation Database.

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image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

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The Cancer Moonshot initiative has been successful in drawing private-sector partners for improving data-sharing among researchers, but the project has yet to mature.

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image: Promiscuous Mice Have Extra-Fast Sperm

Promiscuous Mice Have Extra-Fast Sperm

By | October 19, 2016

The tails of polygamous deer mice sperm have longer midsections than the sperm tails of monogamous individuals of a similar species, and this correlates with improved swimming and competitive ability.

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image: Cellular Cartography

Cellular Cartography

By | October 18, 2016

Researchers launch an initiative to generate a complete atlas of all cells in the human body.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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