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Mouse organoids reveal that a protein active during embryonic development joins forces with gene enhancers to revert cancer cells to an earlier developmental state.

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image: Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

By | July 27, 2017

The embryos, whose genes were altered by CRISPR, were not intended for implantation. 

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Two freely available databases include data on hundreds of human cancer cell lines. 

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image: Stem Cells Seek Out Tumors Based on Stiffness

Stem Cells Seek Out Tumors Based on Stiffness

By | July 26, 2017

The technique, demonstrated in mice using engineered mesenchymal stem cells, has potential for both diagnosis and treatment.

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image: Dogs with Duchenne Treated with Gene Therapy

Dogs with Duchenne Treated with Gene Therapy

By | July 25, 2017

Researchers restored muscle function in animals with muscular dystrophy.

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image: Dogs’ Friendly Demeanor Written in Their DNA

Dogs’ Friendly Demeanor Written in Their DNA

By | July 20, 2017

Researchers pinpoint the genes that make pooches so dang affable.

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image: Dogs Have a Single Genetic Origin: Study

Dogs Have a Single Genetic Origin: Study

By | July 18, 2017

A new genetic analysis contradicts a 2016 study proposing that our canine companions were domesticated from two distinct populations.

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image: Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

By | July 17, 2017

An estimate derived from fertility rates concludes that at least 75 percent of our DNA has no critical utility.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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