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image: Stem Cell Alter Egos

Stem Cell Alter Egos

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers show that cancer stem cells can exist in two distinct and interconvertible states.

1 Comment

image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: New Approach to Killing Cancer

New Approach to Killing Cancer

By | March 22, 2014

A drug tested in mice causes tumor cells to explode.  

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

3 Comments

image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.

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image: Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

By | February 27, 2014

A new camera system supports the visualization of gliomas stained with Tumor Paint, a chlorotoxin-based imaging agent that’s currently in clinical trials.

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image: Paper-Based Cancer Test?

Paper-Based Cancer Test?

By | February 25, 2014

Nanoscale agents that detect disease-associated synthetic biomarkers in urine could one day streamline the diagnosis of tumors, heart disease, and more.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

0 Comments

image: Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

By | January 29, 2014

Swedish scientists have discovered why two antioxidants accelerate tumor growth in mice, helping to explain the results of disappointing human trials.

3 Comments

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