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image: Roche Snags Tumor Tester for $1B

Roche Snags Tumor Tester for $1B

By | January 13, 2015

The pharmaceutical company bought a majority stake in Foundation Medicine, a firm that develops personalized cancer-medicine diagnostics.

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image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk.  

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image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.

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image: “Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

“Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

By | December 17, 2014

Australian researcher Donald Metcalf, whose discoveries transformed cancer treatment, has passed away at age 85.

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image: Vanishing Y Chromosomes

Vanishing Y Chromosomes

By | December 4, 2014

A new study reveals an association between smoking and rates of Y chromosome loss in blood cells, which may explain elevated cancer risk among male smokers.

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image: Cadherin Connection

Cadherin Connection

By | December 1, 2014

A multitasking plasma membrane protein coordinates cell division and energy metabolism in healthy—and perhaps also cancerous—Drosophila cells.

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image: Illuminating the Interactome

Illuminating the Interactome

By | November 20, 2014

A massive screen yields the most comprehensive map of binary human protein interactions to date.

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image: Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

By | November 17, 2014

Improved methods to grow patients’ tumor cells in a dish offer opportunities to find durable therapies.

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image: The Origins of Oversized Chromosomes

The Origins of Oversized Chromosomes

By | November 12, 2014

Researchers reconstruct the formation of the giant neochromosomes that contribute to some cancers.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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