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image: Brain Proteins May Be Key to Aging

Brain Proteins May Be Key to Aging

By | February 8, 2012

Deterioration of long-lived proteins on the surface of neuronal nuclei in the brain could lead to age-related defects in nervous function.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: No Objections to Nano?

Opinion: No Objections to Nano?

By | February 3, 2012

While biotechnology has met with mixed public reactions, to date nanotechnology seems to invoke much less public concern.

42 Comments

image: Multitude of Misconducts

Multitude of Misconducts

By | February 2, 2012

A database manager stole NIH grant funds, falsified data, and lied about it.

9 Comments

image: Sex, Deconstructed

Sex, Deconstructed

By | February 2, 2012

Hormones in the brain control sex-specific behaviors by activating individual genetic programs.

3 Comments

image: What the Brain Hears

What the Brain Hears

By | February 1, 2012

By recording nerve impulses in sound-processing regions of the brain, researchers can recreate the words people think.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Pathological Altruism</em>

Book Excerpt from Pathological Altruism

By | February 1, 2012

In Chapter 1, editors Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, and Michael McGrath introduce the concept of well-intentioned behaviors that go awry.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2012

Neurogastronomy, Why Calories Count, The Kitchen as Laboratory, Fear of Food

1 Comment

image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: Female Frontrunners

Female Frontrunners

By | February 1, 2012

How to successfully surmount the challenges women face in becoming biotech industry leaders

7 Comments

image: Killing with Kindness

Killing with Kindness

By | February 1, 2012

Studying the evolution of altruistic behaviors reveals how knee-jerk good intentions can backfire.

30 Comments

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