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image: Mislabeled Genomes to be Fixed

Mislabeled Genomes to be Fixed

By | September 29, 2015

Conference elicits buzz about the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s efforts to clean up genome entries.         


image: Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

By | September 21, 2015

University administrators request a retraction upon learning that one researcher scooped another’s results despite having agreed not to.


image: Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

By | September 17, 2015

A new analysis reveals yet another gender gap in science.


image: Identity-Shifting Brain Cells

Identity-Shifting Brain Cells

By | September 10, 2015

Cortical interneurons in mice exhibit activity-dependent alterations to their characteristic firing patterns.


image: Characterizing DNA Quadruplexes

Characterizing DNA Quadruplexes

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers are developing new techniques to better understand how and why knots of DNA are distributed throughout the genome.


image: Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

By | September 9, 2015

A study of deceased patients who received injections of cadaver-derived growth hormone hints at the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease. 

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image: Hearing Channel Components Mapped

Hearing Channel Components Mapped

By | September 4, 2015

Localization of two proteins important for inner ear hair cell function suggests they are part of the elusive mechanotransduction channel. 


image: Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

By | September 3, 2015

Online scientific journals are sacrificing the quality of research articles to make a buck.


image: Mapping Corti

Mapping Corti

By | September 3, 2015

The inner ear organ, from macro to micro


image: Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

By | September 2, 2015

Leptin, the satiety hormone produced by fat, affects neuronal signaling in the mouse brain; interference with this pathway can influence the rewarding effects of running in the animals.


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