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image: Life (Re)Cycle

Life (Re)Cycle

By | August 1, 2012

Death breeds life in the world’s most diverse and abundant group of animals.

4 Comments

image: A Scientist Emerges

A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.

3 Comments

image: Frankenlympics?

Frankenlympics?

By | July 26, 2012

Allowing athletes to enhance their performance by using genetic engineering to manipulate their DNA may become a reality of future Olympic Games.

2 Comments

image: Double Duplication

Double Duplication

By | July 24, 2012

Two whole genome duplications boosted the complexity of the ancestor of all vertebrates, but also introduced potential for disease.

0 Comments

image: Microbial Perfume

Microbial Perfume

By | July 23, 2012

Rather than rely on plant-derived products, biotech companies are engineering bacteria and yeast to produce ingredients for fragrances.

4 Comments

image: Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

By | July 12, 2012

Guppies with experimentally shrunken brains produced more offspring than guppies bred for larger noggins, confirming a long suspected tradeoff of bigger brains.

6 Comments

image: Genetic Shift in Salmon

Genetic Shift in Salmon

By | July 12, 2012

A new study finds that an Alaskan population of the fish has quickly evolved in response to warming temperatures.

1 Comment

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | July 11, 2012

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: War-born Climate Change

War-born Climate Change

By | July 3, 2012

A nuclear war could have profound effects on crops yields around the world, according to a new study.

2 Comments

image: Filling in the Missing Letters

Filling in the Missing Letters

By | July 3, 2012

A new algorithm brings together data from second - and third - generation genome sequencers.

1 Comment

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