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The cell-surface receptor, SIRP-alpha, initiates the innate immune response in hosts.  

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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image: Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

By | June 15, 2017

A proposed mechanism for how bearded dragons with male chromosomes hatch as females at high temperatures

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image: Making Public Data Public

Making Public Data Public

By | June 8, 2017

Computational scientists develop a system for spotting data overdue for public release, and end up getting hundreds of open-access datasets corrected.

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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

By | May 22, 2017

Transcript abundance isn’t a reliable indicator of protein quantity, contrary to studies’ suggestions. 

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image: The RNA Age: A Primer

The RNA Age: A Primer

By | May 11, 2017

Our guide to all known forms of RNA, from cis-NAT to vault RNA and everything in between.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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image: Picking Out Patterns

Picking Out Patterns

By | May 1, 2017

Machine-learning algorithms can automate the analysis of cell images and data.

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