The Scientist

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Sharing Longevity Data

Sharing Longevity Data

By | March 1, 2015

Aging research would greatly benefit from consistently making annotated life span data available.

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image: Exploring the Epigenome

Exploring the Epigenome

By | February 18, 2015

A National Institutes of Health-funded consortium publishes 111 reference maps of DNA and histone marks.

2 Comments

image: Human Proteome Mapped Again

Human Proteome Mapped Again

By | January 22, 2015

Researchers complete another interactive protein atlas, boosting the number of publicly available maps of human protein expression levels.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: Mistaken Identities

Mistaken Identities

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers are working to automate the arduous task of identifying—and amending—mislabeled sequences in genetic databases.

1 Comment

image: Journalists to Catalog Retractions

Journalists to Catalog Retractions

By | December 16, 2014

Staff of the blog Retraction Watch will create a database of papers retracted from the scientific literature.

1 Comment

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