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image: Mistaken Identities

Mistaken Identities

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers are working to automate the arduous task of identifying—and amending—mislabeled sequences in genetic databases.

1 Comment

image: Journalists to Catalog Retractions

Journalists to Catalog Retractions

By | December 16, 2014

Staff of the blog Retraction Watch will create a database of papers retracted from the scientific literature.

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image: Publishing Data

Publishing Data

By | May 29, 2014

Nature’s publisher launches a new peer-reviewed, online-only journal that will accept descriptions of data sets.

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image: Sharing the Wealth

Sharing the Wealth

By | May 1, 2014

From research results to electronic health records, biomedical data are becoming increasingly accessible. How can scientists best capitalize on the information deluge?

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image: Opinion: Latent Value in the Literature

Opinion: Latent Value in the Literature

By | April 28, 2014

With scientific budgets eroding, the biomedical community needs to get more return from the data it has already generated.

2 Comments

image: Raw Data’s Vanishing Act

Raw Data’s Vanishing Act

By | December 23, 2013

As scientific publications age, the data that undergird them are disappearing at an alarming rate.

3 Comments

image: Open-Access Genomes

Open-Access Genomes

By | November 8, 2013

The U.K.’s newly launched Personal Genome Project seeks volunteers.  

1 Comment

image: Share and Compare in Real Time

Share and Compare in Real Time

By and | April 11, 2013

Biotech entrepreneur Stephen Friend shares his thoughts on how cancer researchers can collaborate more effectively to achieve faster progress.

1 Comment

image: Networking Medicine

Networking Medicine

By | March 2, 2013

Although fully organized patient-run trials are still few and far between, patients are taking a more active role in clinical research.

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image: Do-It-Yourself Medicine

Do-It-Yourself Medicine

By | March 1, 2013

Patients are sidestepping clinical research and using themselves as guinea pigs to test new treatments for fatal diseases. Will they hurt themselves, or science?

9 Comments

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