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image: Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

By | July 21, 2016

Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 

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image: Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

By | July 14, 2016

Gualicho shinyae evolved small limbs independently of T. rex, researchers report.

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image: Open Letter Leads to Peer Review Changes

Open Letter Leads to Peer Review Changes

By | July 14, 2016

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research will reverse some of the recent changes to its grant-reviewing processes after protests from researchers.

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Nearly 1,200 scientists are asking the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to undo recent changes to its grant-review process.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Interdisciplinary Research Attracts Less Funding

Interdisciplinary Research Attracts Less Funding

By | June 29, 2016

An analysis of Australian Research Council data reveals grant proposals that integrate a broad array of academic fields are less likely to be funded.  

3 Comments

image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

1 Comment

image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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