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The Scientist

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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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image: “Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

“Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

By | July 15, 2014

Linking a mold identified in a sample of recalled yogurt to consumer-reported illnesses may be premature, scientists say.

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image: New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

By | July 9, 2014

An updated analysis of the gut microbiome extends the list of known bacterial genes to 9.8 million. 

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: Mobile Microbiome

Mobile Microbiome

By | June 26, 2014

Cell phones are populated with many bacteria commonly found on users’ hands. 

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image: The Wound Microbiome

The Wound Microbiome

By | June 23, 2014

Determining which critters are present in an infected wound could aid in treatment, particularly of soldiers injured in combat.

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image: Re-examining Rots

Re-examining Rots

By | June 23, 2014

Fungi that digest wood in novel ways could fuel new avenues of research on cellulosic ethanol, and suggest a need to move beyond traditional classification systems.  

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image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

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image: Paralyzed Man Kicks Off World Cup

Paralyzed Man Kicks Off World Cup

By | June 13, 2014

Wearing an exoskeleton that relayed signals from his brain to his legs, a 29-year-old with complete paralysis of the lower trunk performed the ceremonial first kick of the international sporting event.

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