The Scientist

» European Medicines Agency and evolution

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image: Contributors


By and | August 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Finding the Way

Finding the Way

By | August 1, 2013

A focus on the movements of species and disciplines through space, time, and minds

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image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.


image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.


image: EU Considers Curbing Antibiotic Use

EU Considers Curbing Antibiotic Use

By | July 30, 2013

The European Medicines Agency has recommended that farmers stop using the antibiotic colistin prophylactically, citing human health concerns.


image: Pharma Moves Toward Transparency

Pharma Moves Toward Transparency

By | July 29, 2013

The pharmaceutical industry has agreed to share data from clinical trials with researchers, patients, and the public.


image: Keeping Up with Climate Change

Keeping Up with Climate Change

By | July 24, 2013

In order to adapt to this century’s changing temperatures, vertebrates will need to evolve much faster than in previous eras.


image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

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image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.


image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.


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