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image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

1 Comment

image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

4 Comments

image: Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

By | May 14, 2013

Symbiotic fungi on the roots of bean plants can act as an underground signaling network, transmitting early warnings of impending aphid attacks.  

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes

0 Comments

image: Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

By | May 9, 2013

The decline of a population of Arctic foxes isolated on a small Russian island may be due to mercury pollution from their diet of seabirds and seals.

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image: Anti-Malarial Mosquitoes?

Anti-Malarial Mosquitoes?

By | May 9, 2013

Artificially induced bacterial infections in mosquitoes could reduce the spread of malaria-causing parasites.

3 Comments

image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

1 Comment

image: Suited to a T

Suited to a T

By | May 1, 2013

Sorting out T-cell functional and phenotypic heterogeneity depends on studying single cells.

1 Comment

image: Viruses on the Brain

Viruses on the Brain

By | May 1, 2013

Viral infections of the central nervous system may trigger cytokines that induce seizures.

0 Comments

image: Why So Soon?

Why So Soon?

By | May 1, 2013

Researchers are using modern experimental tools to probe the mysterious molecular pathways that lead to premature labor and birth.

4 Comments

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