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Genome Digest

By | May 7, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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In Chapter 4, “Darwin’s Barnacles, Agassiz’s Jellyfish,” author Christoph Irmscher describes his subject’s obsession with marine organisms.

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image: Flying Frog, 1855

Flying Frog, 1855

By | May 1, 2013

Alfred Russel Wallace, Darwin’s unheralded codiscoverer of the theory of evolution by natural selection, found inspiration in the specimens he collected on his travels.

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2013

May 2013's selection of notable quotes

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The King of Turtles

By | May 1, 2013

American naturalist Louis Agassiz had a zeal for collecting that encouraged a nation to engage with nature.

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Humans Under Pressure

By | April 25, 2013

Better health care in Gambian villages lead to flip-flopping selection pressures on height and weight.

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image: Italy Animal Lab Trashed

Italy Animal Lab Trashed

By | April 24, 2013

Animal-rights activists devastate a psychiatric research lab at the University of Milan.

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image: Naturalist’s House for Sale

Naturalist’s House for Sale

By | April 22, 2013

One of the surviving UK homes of pioneering but long-overlooked evolutionary theorist Alfred Russel Wallace is on the market.

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image: Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

By | April 22, 2013

A new study suggests that in the Spanish Habsburg royal family, natural selection may have diminished the most harmful effects of inbreeding.

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image: Beer Tastes Intoxicating

Beer Tastes Intoxicating

By | April 15, 2013

Just the flavor of beer is enough to boost dopamine in brain areas related to reward—especially in men with alcoholic relatives.

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