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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

By | April 13, 2017

SHERLOCK combines CRISPR-Cas13a with isothermal RNA amplification to detect RNA and DNA with single-base specificity.

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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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By converting glial cells into dopaminergic neurons, scientists were able to partially rescue motor behavior in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

By | April 7, 2017

After an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.

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image: Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

By | March 30, 2017

Two chips implanted in a quadriplegic patient’s motor cortex and 36 electrodes in his right arm allow the man to control the movement of his right arm and hand.

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image: Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

By | March 28, 2017

In an effort to prevent the spread of Zika virus, Harris County officials are in discussions with Oxitec to release insects engineered to produce short-lived offspring.

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The University of Rhode Island neurotoxicologist and dean came to the U.S. for college in the 1980s. 

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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image: Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

By | March 21, 2017

Ben Henry delves into the still-unanswered questions of where our musical preferences come from and what makes synesthetes tick.

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