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image: Glia Guru

Glia Guru

By | May 1, 2017

Ben Barres recast glial cells from supporting actors to star performers, crucial for synaptic plasticity in the brain and for preventing neurodegenerative disorders.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Myelin Basics

Myelin Basics

By | May 1, 2017

May Profilee Ben Barres of Stanford University discusses how understanding the basic biology of myelination could help patients with multiple sclerosis and other diseases.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

By | May 1, 2017

Understanding how people recognize and control their own bodies could help researchers develop therapies for those who’ve lost their sense of self.

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image: Developing Brains in Dishes

Developing Brains in Dishes

By | April 26, 2017

Two studies report methods to mimic human fetal brain development using neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells that form 3-D, brain-like structures. 

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

By | April 13, 2017

SHERLOCK combines CRISPR-Cas13a with isothermal RNA amplification to detect RNA and DNA with single-base specificity.

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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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