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image: Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

By | June 25, 2014

E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.

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image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.

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image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

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image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

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