The Scientist

» hybridization and immunology

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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

1 Comment

image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

1 Comment

image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

1 Comment

image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

1 Comment

image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

3 Comments

image: Interferon Discoverer Dies

Interferon Discoverer Dies

By | January 26, 2015

Jean Lindemann, the virologist who helped figure out that interferons were responsible for anti-viral responses, has passed away at age 90.

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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

2 Comments

image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

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