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image: Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

By | June 1, 2016

Pooping into a petri dish is becoming standard practice as part of some college biology courses.

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

By | May 25, 2016

Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.

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Post-publication peer review prompts the authors to clarify the ages of mice used in their experiments and share additional data.

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image: Population Ecologist Dies

Population Ecologist Dies

By | May 18, 2016

Ilkka Hanski of the University of Helsinki has passed away at age 63.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

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image: Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

By | May 9, 2016

A drug that singles out Staphylococcus aureus leaves gut-dwelling microbiota largely intact, a mouse study shows.

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image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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