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image: Sex Differences in Immune Response

Sex Differences in Immune Response

By | June 21, 2016

Female mice lacking an immune receptor are better than males at fighting certain viral infections.

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image: Identifying Resilient Reefs

Identifying Resilient Reefs

By | June 16, 2016

Researchers identify areas where marine ecosystems are faring better or worse than predicted in hopes of saving the world’s corals.

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image: Prominent Ecologist Dies

Prominent Ecologist Dies

By | June 16, 2016

Bob Paine, best known for introducing the idea of “keystone species,” has passed away at age 83.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Enhancing Vaccine Development

Enhancing Vaccine Development

By | June 1, 2016

Using proteomics methods to inform antigen selection

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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Member, Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Age: 43

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

By | June 1, 2016

Training the immune system to cease fire on native tissues could improve outcomes for autoimmune patients, but clinical progress has been slow.

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image: Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

By | May 25, 2016

Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.

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