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image: Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

By | May 1, 2014

A report reveals that using bone marrow stem cells to treat heart disease is less promising than a decade of research has let on.

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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Something Is Killing Asian Carp

Something Is Killing Asian Carp

By | April 29, 2014

Half a million invasive silver carp are dead in a Kentucky river, and nobody knows why.

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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

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Python Auto-Pilot

By | March 20, 2014

Invasive snakes in Florida show evidence of a compass sense they use to navigate back to home territory.

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Old-School Fish Guides

By | March 18, 2014

Experienced fish may be critical for keeping migrating populations on track, a study finds.

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image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

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image: Saving Failing Hearts

Saving Failing Hearts

By | March 12, 2014

Inhibiting a small regulatory RNA appears to improve cardiac function in mice with surgically induced heart problems.

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