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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Hearts in Hand

Hearts in Hand

By | January 1, 2016

Texas Heart Institute heart surgeon Bud Frazier is a pioneer of heart transplant technologies.

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image: If It Ain't Broke . . .

If It Ain't Broke . . .

By | January 1, 2016

Is there room to improve upon the tried-and-true, decades-old technology of artificial hearts?

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image: Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

By | May 1, 2014

A report reveals that using bone marrow stem cells to treat heart disease is less promising than a decade of research has let on.

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image: Saving Failing Hearts

Saving Failing Hearts

By | March 12, 2014

Inhibiting a small regulatory RNA appears to improve cardiac function in mice with surgically induced heart problems.

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image: Next Generation: Sensor-Laden Sheath to Monitor the Heart

Next Generation: Sensor-Laden Sheath to Monitor the Heart

By | February 25, 2014

A flexible, sensor-loaded membrane that fits snugly around the heart provides high-resolution monitoring of multiple cardiac health markers.

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image: More Questionable Stem-Cell Science

More Questionable Stem-Cell Science

By | June 18, 2013

Disgraced stem-cell researcher Hisashi Moriguchi has published three new papers in BMJ Case Reports, including a rehashing of a retracted 2012 paper.

13 Comments

image: Blood Protein Rejuvenates Aging Heart

Blood Protein Rejuvenates Aging Heart

By | May 10, 2013

A molecule found only in the blood of young mice dramatically reverses thickening and stiffening of the heart muscle in old mice.

10 Comments

image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.

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