The Scientist

» organogenesis and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Microbial Mediators

Microbial Mediators

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers show that symbiotic bacteria can help hyenas communicate with one another.

1 Comment

image: Astrogerm

Astrogerm

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers find a new bacterial species lurking in clean rooms used to assemble spacecraft at NASA and the European Space Agency.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: I Want My Kidney

Opinion: I Want My Kidney

By | November 7, 2013

With the advent of xenotransplantation, tissues made from cell-seeded scaffolds, and 3-D-printing, custom-made organs must be right around the corner.

9 Comments

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: October 7–11

Week in Review: October 7–11

By | October 11, 2013

Nobels awarded for vesicle trafficking and computational chemistry; building 3-D microbial communities; mislabeled microbes cause retractions

0 Comments

image: Building 3-D Microbial Communities

Building 3-D Microbial Communities

By | October 7, 2013

Researchers apply a 3-D printing technique to structure populations of bacteria in a three-dimensional environment.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: September 30–October 4

Week in Review: September 30–October 4

By | October 4, 2013

Scientists feel the shutdown’s sting; dogs comprehend human cues; lab-grown secretory glands; whether online comments help or hurt science

0 Comments

image: Replacement Secretory Glands

Replacement Secretory Glands

By | October 1, 2013

Researchers have engineered functional, lab-grown precursors to salivary and tear glands, successfully connecting them to ducts and nerves in mice.

0 Comments

image: Trouble in the Heartland

Trouble in the Heartland

By | October 1, 2013

A new tick-borne disease has emerged in the US Midwest—and the culprit is not a bacterium. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Unstructured Proteins Help Tardigrades Survive Desiccation
  2. What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science
    News Analysis What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science

    A look at the historical effects of downsized research funding suggests that the Trump administration’s proposed budget could hit early-career scientists the hardest.  

  3. Opinion: On “The Impact Factor Fallacy”
  4. Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution
Business Birmingham