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image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: In Situ Antibodies

In Situ Antibodies

By | February 2, 2016

Compared with systemic injections, localized antibody therapies may be more effective for some indications.

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image: Antibody Alternatives

Antibody Alternatives

By and | February 1, 2016

Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

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image: Exercises for Your Abs

Exercises for Your Abs

By | February 1, 2016

Companies make the antibodies, but it’s up to you to make sure they work in your experiments.

3 Comments

image: Building Better Reagents

Building Better Reagents

By and | February 1, 2016

Facing problems of inconsistent, time-consuming, and costly antibody production, some researchers are turning to alternatives to target specific proteins of interest, in the lab and in the clinic.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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Some antibodies designed to eliminate the plaques prominent in Alzheimer’s disease can aggravate neuronal hyperactivity in mice.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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