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image: How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

By | July 21, 2016

The results of studies on humans and zebrafish suggest how hyperglycemia can cause cognitive deficits.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

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image: How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

By | July 1, 2016

Lipids and insulin play important roles in blood sugar regulation, and altered levels of either could kick start metabolic dysfunction.

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image: What Causes Type 2 Diabetes?

What Causes Type 2 Diabetes?

By | July 1, 2016

Insulin resistance and high levels of insulin and lipids all precede the development of metabolic dysfunction. Which metabolic factor is to blame?

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

By | June 1, 2016

Training the immune system to cease fire on native tissues could improve outcomes for autoimmune patients, but clinical progress has been slow.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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