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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

By | July 1, 2015

Annually, about 184,000 deaths annually are linked to drinking sugary beverages, according to a new study.

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image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

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image: Week in Review: June 22–26

Week in Review: June 22–26

By | June 26, 2015

Neanderthal-human hybrid discovered; the neurobiology of fear behavior; and an insulin patch that responds to high glucose levels in mice

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image: Next Generation: Smart Insulin Patch

Next Generation: Smart Insulin Patch

By | June 22, 2015

A microneedle patch automatically releases insulin in response to high glucose levels.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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