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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Diabetes “Breakthrough” Breaks Up

Diabetes “Breakthrough” Breaks Up

By | October 27, 2014

A hormone thought to make murine insulin-secreting cells proliferate in mice did not perform in replication studies.

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image: Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

By | October 13, 2014

Researchers craft hormone-producing pancreas cells from human embryonic stem cells, paving the way for a cell therapy to treat diabetes.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: How Bulgy Bears Keep Diabetes at Bay

How Bulgy Bears Keep Diabetes at Bay

By | August 8, 2014

A genetic switch in hibernating bears keeps the animals from becoming insulin-resistant. 

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image: Google, Novartis to Develop Smart Contacts

Google, Novartis to Develop Smart Contacts

By | July 17, 2014

The technologically advanced eyewear monitors blood sugar concentrations in diabetic patients.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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