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image: Exercise Alters Epigenetics

Exercise Alters Epigenetics

By | March 6, 2012

Exercise causes short-term changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in muscle tissue that may have implications for type 2 diabetes.

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image: Antarctic Invasion

Antarctic Invasion

By | March 5, 2012

Invasive species threaten the most pristine place on Earth.

4 Comments

Contributors

March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

By | March 1, 2012

Vitamin D has a variety of actions in the body. It binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which then binds to the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and activates the expression of numerous genes. 

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image: One Year On

One Year On

By | March 1, 2012

Some thoughts about the ecological fallout from Fukushima

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image: Vitamin D on Trial

Vitamin D on Trial

By | March 1, 2012

Prevention trials for vitamins and supplements are notoriously difficult, but some researchers aren’t giving up on finding proof that vitamin D helps ward off disease.

52 Comments

image: Climate Conflict of Interest?

Climate Conflict of Interest?

By | February 24, 2012

Greenpeace flags researchers' payments from a climate change skeptic organization.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 21, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

2 Comments

image: Boozing for Better Health

Boozing for Better Health

By | February 16, 2012

Fruit flies consume alcohol to kill off parasites.

12 Comments

image: Fukushima Birds Affected

Fukushima Birds Affected

By | February 9, 2012

Radiation in Fukushima Prefecture is reducing bird populations less than 1 year since the nuclear disaster.

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