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image: Earth’s “Cousin” Found

Earth’s “Cousin” Found

By | April 21, 2014

Researchers pinpoint a distant planet that may be the right size and temperature to support liquid water and life.

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image: Saturn’s Icy Moon Harbors Ocean

Saturn’s Icy Moon Harbors Ocean

By | April 4, 2014

A body of liquid water beneath Enceladus’s surface makes the tiny moon a potentially hospitable home for extraterrestrial life.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Lucky Planet</em>

Book Excerpt from Lucky Planet

By | March 1, 2014

In the book's prologue, author David Waltham compares a fictitious planet to Earth, highlighting the biologically supportive luck that our planet has enjoyed.

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image: Is Earth Special?

Is Earth Special?

By | March 1, 2014

Reconsidering the uniqueness of life on our planet

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image: Summoned From the Depths

Summoned From the Depths

By | March 1, 2014

Geobiologist Roger Summons analyzes organic material in rocks found deep inside Earth, looking for evidence of how life originated and evolved on our planet—and possibly on Mars.  

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image: Astrogerm

Astrogerm

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers find a new bacterial species lurking in clean rooms used to assemble spacecraft at NASA and the European Space Agency.

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image: Point of Impact

Point of Impact

By | September 16, 2013

The collision of comets and icy surfaces can spur the formation of amino acids.

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image: Intelligent Life: The Search Continues

Intelligent Life: The Search Continues

By | August 1, 2013

Humans continue to scan the cosmos for a familiar brand of intelligence while ignoring a deeper form that pulses here at home.

9 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2013

July 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

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