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image: Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

By | April 1, 2017

New monoclonal antibodies kill both cancer-promoting immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in culture.

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image: Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers report evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement in a Zika-infected, immunocompromised mouse model.

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image: Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers are searching for ways to prevent the coronavirus from attaching to DPP-4 receptors, blocking it from invading and replicating within host cells.

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image: TS Picks: March 30, 2017

TS Picks: March 30, 2017

By | March 30, 2017

Obama administration’s science advisers stick together; “allies confident” NIH Director Francis Collins can dissuade Congress from approving drastic budget cuts; how Brexit may affect scientists

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image: NIH: Grant Applicants Can Cite Preprints

NIH: Grant Applicants Can Cite Preprints

By | March 27, 2017

In an agency first, the National Institutes of Health provides guidance on citing certain non-peer-reviewed publications in agency proposals and reports.

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image: TS Picks: March 23, 2017

TS Picks: March 23, 2017

By | March 23, 2017

Reacting to the White House budget proposal; tracking “attacks on science”

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image: What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science

What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science

By | March 21, 2017

A look at the historical effects of downsized research funding suggests that the Trump administration’s proposed budget could hit early-career scientists the hardest.  

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image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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Officials at scientific societies and advocacy organizations urge lawmakers to push back against proposed cuts at the NIH and other agencies.

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