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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

image: Improving Federal Oversight of HHS Grantees

Improving Federal Oversight of HHS Grantees

By | September 4, 2015

The US Department of Health and Human Services considers ways to mitigate the risk of poor performance or misuse of funds by grantees.

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

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image: A Costly Case of Grant Fraud

A Costly Case of Grant Fraud

By | August 24, 2015

The National Science Foundation orders Northeastern University to repay $2.7 million for nine years of mismanaging a federal grant.

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image: Report: Impact of Biomedical Research Slipping

Report: Impact of Biomedical Research Slipping

By | August 18, 2015

Despite dramatic increases in publications, the last 50 years have seen relatively little return on investment for US public health, a study suggests.

15 Comments

image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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