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image: Columbia Pays Millions to Settle Fraud Claim

Columbia Pays Millions to Settle Fraud Claim

By | October 30, 2014

The university has agreed to pay more than $9 million to resolve a lawsuit filed by the US government over the submission of false claims regarding federal research funds.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: Opinion: Separate Training from Research Budgets

Opinion: Separate Training from Research Budgets

By | October 7, 2014

In order to make the most of biomedical research funding and to better support trainees, institutions should recognize postdocs as employees.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: $300M Boost for BRAIN

$300M Boost for BRAIN

By | September 30, 2014

Mix of public, private, philanthropic, and academic investments will fund additional BRAIN Initiative-related projects.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Rat Massages Get the Golden Goose

Rat Massages Get the Golden Goose

By | September 4, 2014

Award recognizes research that has improved outcomes for premature babies.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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