The Scientist

» NASA and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Science on Ice

Science on Ice

By | January 2, 2013

Meet the research team that uncovered an algal bloom churning in freezing Arctic waters.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Water Ice Detected on Mercury

Water Ice Detected on Mercury

By | November 30, 2012

NASA scientists have confirmed that water persists as pockets of ice on the surface of the planet closest to our Sun.

0 Comments

image: NASA Scientists Keep Curiosity Finding Secret

NASA Scientists Keep Curiosity Finding Secret

By | November 27, 2012

The Mars rover has reportedly made a major discovery, but the world won’t know what it is until next week at the earliest.

2 Comments

image: The Martian Tempest

The Martian Tempest

By | November 26, 2012

NASA scientists are closely watching a dust storm on Mars that threatens to go global and interfere with rovers on the planet’s surface.

0 Comments

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

0 Comments

image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

0 Comments

image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
  2. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  3. The Lies That Scars Tell
    Notebook The Lies That Scars Tell

    Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

  4. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist