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image: The Eye

The Eye

By | October 1, 2014

An overview of visual processing

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image: The Bionic Eye

The Bionic Eye

By | October 1, 2014

Using the latest technologies, researchers are constructing novel prosthetic devices to restore vision in the blind.

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image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

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image: Eye Spies

Eye Spies

By | October 1, 2014

An issue highlighting advances in vision research

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image: Giving the Gift of Sight

Giving the Gift of Sight

By | October 1, 2014

See global ophthalmologist Geoff Tabin describe his experiences performing cataract surgeries in Nepal and Africa.

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image: Let There Be Sight

Let There Be Sight

By | October 1, 2014

Hear from Diane Ashworth, one of the world’s first recipients of a bionic eye implant.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: Soil Microbiome of Central Park

Soil Microbiome of Central Park

By | September 30, 2014

Nearly 600 soil samples from New York City’s famous park reveal that the urban environment harbors just as much biodiversity as natural ecosystems across the globe.

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image: Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

By | September 23, 2014

Lengthy stints in intensive care units pare down patients’ gut microflora, a study shows.

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