The Scientist

» eye and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Eyelash Defenders

Eyelash Defenders

By | February 25, 2015

Mammalian eyelashes are the optimal length for protecting eyes from dust and drying out, a study suggests.

0 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

0 Comments

image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

0 Comments

image: The Eye

The Eye

By | October 1, 2014

An overview of visual processing

1 Comment

image: The Bionic Eye

The Bionic Eye

By | October 1, 2014

Using the latest technologies, researchers are constructing novel prosthetic devices to restore vision in the blind.

0 Comments

image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

1 Comment

image: Eye Spies

Eye Spies

By | October 1, 2014

An issue highlighting advances in vision research

0 Comments

image: Giving the Gift of Sight

Giving the Gift of Sight

By | October 1, 2014

See global ophthalmologist Geoff Tabin describe his experiences performing cataract surgeries in Nepal and Africa.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Stomach Cells Change Identity to Drive Precancerous State
  4. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
AAAS