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image: Contributors


By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.


image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.


image: DNA Reveals Ancient Looks

DNA Reveals Ancient Looks

By | January 17, 2013

By analyzing a collection of 24 genetic variations, researchers are able to predict the hair and eye color of long-dead humans.


image: Bones Get in Her Eyes

Bones Get in Her Eyes

By | December 20, 2012

After undergoing untested cosmetic surgery that uses stem cells to rejuvenate skin, a woman grew bone fragments in the flesh around one of her eyes.


image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: The Meaning of Pupil Dilation

The Meaning of Pupil Dilation

By | December 6, 2012

Scientists are using pupil measurements to study a wide range of psychological processes and to get a glimpse into the mind.


image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.


image: Contributors


By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.


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