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» fish, developmental biology and immunology

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image: Walking Fish Model Evolution

Walking Fish Model Evolution

By | August 28, 2014

Raising a semi-terrestrial species on land highlights the role of developmental plasticity in the evolutionary transition from water to land.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Seeing Red

Seeing Red

By | August 1, 2014

Reef fish, once thought to be unable to see red wavelengths, not only fluoresce deep red, but males of some species react to seeing their own bioluminescent pattern.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Slippery Passion

Slippery Passion

By | July 1, 2014

Observe the sinuous sensuality of mating brook lampreys (Lampetra planeri).

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

1 Comment

image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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