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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

By | September 25, 2014

Tetra fish adapted to extreme darkness lose circadian metabolic rhythms to conserve energy, according to a study. 

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Walking Fish Model Evolution

Walking Fish Model Evolution

By | August 28, 2014

Raising a semi-terrestrial species on land highlights the role of developmental plasticity in the evolutionary transition from water to land.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Seeing Red

Seeing Red

By | August 1, 2014

Reef fish, once thought to be unable to see red wavelengths, not only fluoresce deep red, but males of some species react to seeing their own bioluminescent pattern.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Slippery Passion

Slippery Passion

By | July 1, 2014

Observe the sinuous sensuality of mating brook lampreys (Lampetra planeri).

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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