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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | October 13, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Can’t Take the Heat

Can’t Take the Heat

By | October 10, 2014

Warming waters will cause many fish species to move from the tropics toward the poles, a study predicts.

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image: One Fish, Two Fish

One Fish, Two Fish

By | October 1, 2014

Despite a lack of vision, a blind cavefish can count. Sort of.

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Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

By | September 25, 2014

Tetra fish adapted to extreme darkness lose circadian metabolic rhythms to conserve energy, according to a study. 

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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