The Scientist

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

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Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Swallowing Without a Tongue

Swallowing Without a Tongue

By | March 18, 2015

On land, mudskippers use mouthfuls of water like land-based amphibians use their fleshy tongues to catch and swallow prey.

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image: Prominent Marine Biologist Dies

Prominent Marine Biologist Dies

By | February 27, 2015

Eugenie Clark, known to many as “Shark Lady,” has passed away at age 92.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 6, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Reassessing One Really Old Fish

Reassessing One Really Old Fish

By | January 13, 2015

New analysis of an ancient specimen prompts a rethink of fish forebears.

1 Comment

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

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