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» fish and developmental biology

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image: Cancer Claims Fish

Cancer Claims Fish

By | August 2, 2012

Australian trout are susceptible to skin cancer, according to a new study—the first evidence that wild fish can be afflicted by the disease.

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: DayGlo Science

DayGlo Science

By | July 20, 2012

Biologist David Gruber studies radiant creatures and their fluorescent proteins.

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image: Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

By | July 12, 2012

Guppies with experimentally shrunken brains produced more offspring than guppies bred for larger noggins, confirming a long suspected tradeoff of bigger brains.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

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image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

By | May 28, 2012

Radioactive particles from the Fukushima nuclear disaster provide an unexpected way to track migratory marine species.

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image: DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

By | May 24, 2012

A new SNP assay can determine the geographical origin of commonly overexploited fish species.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

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image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

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