The Scientist

» space biology

Most Recent

The plumes that erupt through the cracks on the icy exterior of one of Saturn’s moons contain molecular hydrogen, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Polar Algae Survive More Than a Year in Space

Polar Algae Survive More Than a Year in Space

By | February 13, 2017

Two samples of Sphaerocystis that spent 530 days growing on a panel outside of the International Space Station have returned to Earth largely unscathed.

2 Comments

image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: On Space and Health

Opinion: On Space and Health

By | September 24, 2013

What health and space sciences can learn from each other to boost innovation

1 Comment

image: Radiation Risk for Mars Astronauts

Radiation Risk for Mars Astronauts

By | June 3, 2013

An instrument aboard the spaceship that carried Curiosity to Mars has found that deep space travelers would face worrying levels of radiation.

0 Comments

image: Water Once Ran on Mars

Water Once Ran on Mars

By | October 1, 2012

The Curiosity rover discovers pebbles that were likely formed by ancient streams on the Red Planet.

4 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

0 Comments

image: Space Rocks

Space Rocks

By | June 1, 2012

Orbiting ultrasound machines are being used to diagnose and treat astronauts' kidney stones.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS