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image: Why Screams Scare Us

Why Screams Scare Us

By | July 20, 2015

Analyzing the acoustical qualities of screams and other sounds, researchers pinpoint why people find screams—and emergency vehicle sirens—frightening.

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image: Underground Immunity

Underground Immunity

By | July 16, 2015

Arabidopsis thaliana defense hormones shape the plant’s root microbiome. 

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image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

1 Comment

image: Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

By | July 10, 2015

Researchers network the brains of three monkeys to create a “living computer” that can steer an image of a robotic arm toward a target.

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image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

3 Comments

image: Epigenetic Mechanism Tunes Brain Cells

Epigenetic Mechanism Tunes Brain Cells

By | July 2, 2015

Regular replacement of histones in human and murine neurons is required for neuronal plasticity, a study shows.

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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

14 Comments

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