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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Thoughts Derailed

Thoughts Derailed

By | April 18, 2016

The same brain mechanism by which surprising events interrupt movements may also be involved in disrupting cognition, according to a study.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

By | April 7, 2016

Analyzing resting brain scans, researchers can anticipate the brain activities of a person performing a range of tasks. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: Neural Basis of Risk Aversion

Neural Basis of Risk Aversion

By | March 24, 2016

Researchers identify and manipulate a signal in the brains of rats that controls risky behavior.

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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